2013-05-08 10.24.56

It was not before three days later, when my subsequent hosts Ronit Abutbul and Brit Gilad discussed the next stage of the walk, that it became clear some misunderstanding slipped in. While arranging things somebody said or somebody heard that the ones hosting me should take me to interesting places in the neighborhoods but definitely not for long walks! This 60 year old lady shouldn’t be exhausted too much in this heat! At that point I understood why we were driving around in cars and I was taken to some panorama or another beautiful view at the river. It usually takes some effort and repetition to make clear that a walk or a hike means taking your rug sack in the morning and walking until you arrive some other place in the evening. And there is a hiking trail all through Israel from north to south that I was expecting to have followed.  After this misunderstanding was solved that is what finally happened on day 5 in the north.

Before Ronit, the homeopathic vet with her two inseparable little dogs took me to a waterfall and beautiful overviews over the Lake of Galilee. I came to learn that the lake of Tiberias or the lake of Genezareth are all the same. Here Jesus walked on the waters and in the nearby Church of the Beatitudes the Sermon on the Mount is remembered. Friends of Ronit came with us and before I knew I found myself invited in the office of the Mother Superior of the nearby Convent.  She ordered (strong) coffee and homemade cookies and spoke fluently Arabic, as well as English, Italian, French and a few other languages. The conversation went from the political and religious situation to the exact place where what miracle took place. As I said before: homeopathy takes you everywhere.

The evening walk along the lake and a climb uphill at sunset was unforgettable. I’m no table to remember all the names of places people pointed out to me but it can’t be denied that this territory is drenched with history and religion. The fact that the whole world focuses at this tiny country makes you feel you walk the navel of the planet.

Yet people are people everywhere. Hence our days are filled with our daily business: talking about homeopathy, going for a picnic or a meal, visiting people. Ronit and I ended up at Beatrice’s house where her husband already prepared a meal by the time we came back. She and Ronit, both native French speakers chatted away their day of grace while enjoying an elegant supper. Sitting on the terrace in the soft evening breeze military helicopters flew over. We discussed the news of the day  saying the situation is escalating as it was termed in the international press. People here more or less shrug their shoulders and live with the fact that they live near the border of an enemy country and rely on their army to protect them. EXIF_IMG
I’ve seen the Golan Heights from all sides, walk on it and drove right through it. From this side it is the buffer zone between two fighting parties but I’m well aware that it might sound completely different would I talk to the other side. We as homeopaths know better than anyone how people all have their own point of view on the same situation.

Brit lives with her husband Adam and child in a kibbutz near the Lebanese border, way up in the north of the country.  Shahaf who joined us from Modi’in, some two hours and a half drive to the south joined us and stayed at Brit’s place for two nights. This all resulted in a whole lot of arguing about the tracks but also in beautiful longer walks up the Metula, and parts of the Israel Trail. In the evening Brit prepared lovely meals served in the little garden in front of the house with a view on the snowy patches on Mount Hermon.  Although rather cool way up here in contrast to the heat down in the valley, we stayed out until midnight. The evening of Shabbat with three soldiers Brit invited, came over to have supper with us. As all Israeli people served the army when they were young they always have memories and experiences to share.

 

 

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